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"At the moment I tend to think about topics in a more positive way. I feel an inner need to direct my attention to the softer, friendlier and warmer aspects of life, which awaken a sense of openness and acceptance in me. The contrast I created in the past by focusing on serious topics and bringing humor to them is now reversed. My focus is leaning more toward topics that create a sense of belonging or connection, but within them something serious is being addressed. ... Even after the production is done, one has to communicate to oneself and to the team what it is they have actually created and how to replicate it again. With solo work, I don't talk to myself, but I still have to communicate with the people that make up the team around me, so dialogue is still central. I can't actually create on my own, I need someone to be there to at least either watch or talk to me."

Lucie Kocourková, Alica Minar

INTERVIEW

"Objects have a rich world to offer. I feel that even if I have a certain necessity for my body to move, the objects have a legacy that makes them easier to enter. The objects and the body are like partners for me, there's not one more important than the other, they coexist together and through their meeting, we can express certain things, which are maybe spiritual, physical or emotional. … This strangeness and this weirdness are part of the extravagance and aesthetic that I'm working with and that I try to offer. This bizarreness of certain situations in life creates humor. I think that if you have a difficult topic, it's easier and more accessible to enter it playfully and weirdly. It gives you more freedom."

Sara Castro, Alica Minar

INTERVIEW

"I never wanted to limit myself to what I see in my immediate surroundings. I always wanted to get out there. I wanted to see art with my own eyes, to be present to what was happening on the international scene. Which is also what drove me towards post-dance-motivated ideas even before getting into the Post Dance book (Moderna Dansteatern, Stockholm). All put together, it has become a long-lasting passion that strongly influences the way I create. ... I guess I'm always looking for the source, the reason why I move or why someone should watch me move. When someone comes to my workshop to experience something with me, it's different. Necessity, in my opinion, is the quality with which a choreographer defines why anyone should care about what is happening on stage. It's about creating a relationship between the observer (witness) and the mover (mover). When I perform, it's not purely about my experience of the dance, but about the relationship between the stage and the audience."

Hana Polanská, Petr Soukup a Alica Minar

INTERVIEW

"The dancers act as a tight-knit team, in sync with the choreographer and her vision, as well as other elements of the production such as music, set design and costumes. ... Having the opportunity to experience WOODS WON'T VAPORIZE in two different settings, I get the sense that Alica Minar's choreography is consciously loose in its construction, which changes according to the place where it is danced. While tree roots are very stable bases, where they grow is a combination of chance and necessity that only untamed nature understands. Alica Minar's production has similar qualities." WOODS WON’T VAPORIZE 25.06.2023 REVIEW

Kateřina Šilhová

REVIEW

"Humanoid movements are broken by animal instincts and reactions. Their actions on the ground initially suggest the generation of energy from the soil, from the roots, which in turn has a double meaning, one concrete, since trees have roots, the other abstract, since we also use the word roots in a figurative sense, for phenomena and relationships that nourish us mentally, not with sap. Such imaginary sap circulates through the group of dancers." "I appreciate Vi Huyen Tran's musical landscape and Raquel Rosildete's evocative lighting design, which creates various atmospheric changes, a misty landscape, a desert or an aurora borealis."

Lucie Kocourková

REVIEW

"Explosion is mainly a feast for the eyes, with all sorts of scenic paraphernalia that the four dancers move around like boxes, creating a space that looks like a futuristic doll's room and at the same time a carefully assembled collage and a work of art in itself. The performance is characterised by an optimistic pastel colour palette. ... The movement of the four dancers is vibrant, rhythmic and includes many jumps. With the help of props, the performers create situational humour; for example, they take turns jumping on fatboys, each time catapulting the other off. At times their movement again makes it seem as if the foursome is in trench warfare, fleeing from an unseen danger. Explosion has no narrative ambition, but it never ceases to fascinate aesthetically."

Clara Zanga

REVIEW